Robert Ornstein
Home Page
Biographical Informatiom
Awards & Honors
Books & Publications
Tick Lectures
Research
Newest Publications:
HUMANITY ON A TIGHTROPE
With Paul R. Ehrlich
Available Now!

THE HUMAN JOURNEY
A project under the direction of Robert Ornstein with contributions from associates of The Institute for the Study of Human Knowledge.

"The future depends on how we understand who we are, and how the past has made us so: what is unchanging about Human Nature, and what we CAN and MUST change to face a world that is far different from our ancestors'". From the Introduction, www.humanjourney.us

ALL ABOUT ME
The All About Me is a series of books to help young people understand themselves and how we all, as a human beings, work. This is fundamental information, but we often forget to teach students about it in school. The series provides an all-inclusive program designed to meet the American Psychological Association's National Standards for Psychology at the high school level, the standards established for the College Board AP Psychology course, and the National Board Standards for Science/Adolescent and Young Adulthood. Focused on the mind, each text provides a set of lessons and various activities that teach sophisticated brain research in an accessible and interesting way. Edited by Robert Ornstein and Denise Nessel, with a Foreword by Robert Ornstein.

For more information please visit: www.hoopoekids.com/all-about-me/

CURRENT LECTURES

THE BRAIN: WHAT'S RIGHT AND WHAT'S LEFT
The discovery of the different workings of the two sides of the brain has been, perhaps, the most exciting and controversial topic in human science for decades. Now that thousands of studies have been done, some of the research is even more surprising than originally thought.

NEW WORLD NEW MIND: NEW IDEAS
The human mental system evolved to suit conditions that faced our ancestors millennia ago. We still have that mind, one adapted to a short timeframe and a short horizon world, in which changes took place over centuries not hours. The human mind is failing to comprehend a world in which more people are added each month than were living at the time of Christ. We misperceive threats, leading to an exaggerated response, for instance, to terrorism and too little response to constant dangers such as smoking and pollution. How to change this is the subject!

MULTIMIND
We do not have a thoroughly modern mind although we live in a thoroughly modern world. We do not have a single brain; we have a multiple one. We have a complex and unorganized collection of special-purpose solutions to meet different circumstances. We have "small" minds for reacting to emergencies, for detecting sharp changes in the environment, and many "minds of the body" which control health. The brain contains several different and independent centers of action each of which has a "mind of its own." There are significant problems for the maintenance of our health when our separated small minds disagree.

TEACHING-STORIES AND THE BRAIN
Teaching-Stories activate the right side of the brain much more than does reading normal prose. The right side of the brain provides "context," the essential function of putting together the different components of experience. The left side provides the "text," or the pieces themselves. These stories are designed to embody--in their characters, plots and imagery--patterns and relationships that nurture a part of the mind that is unreachable in more direct ways, thus increasing our understanding and perceptions. Such stories are pivotal in cognitive development, they lead the child and then the adult to learn more about what happens in the world, when and how events come together.

For information and availability please contact: Shane DeHaven at 650-948-2518 (Los Altos, CA)


2002   TEACHING-STORIES AND THE BRAIN

The Library of Congress, Washington D.C.

Teaching-Stories activate the right side of the brain much more than does reading normal prose. The right side of the brain provides "context," the essential function of putting together the different components of experience. The left side provides the "text," or the pieces themselves. These stories are designed to embody--in their characters, plots and imagery--patterns and relationships that nurture a part of the mind that is unreachable in more direct ways, thus increasing our understanding and perceptions. Such stories are pivotal in cognitive development, they lead the child and then the adult to learn more about what happens in the world, when and how events come together.


1991   THE ROAD TO THE FUTURE

The Institute for the Study of Human Knowledge
San Francisco

The human mind is unprepared to face the modern. It evolved to suit a stable world where changes were measured in millennia, where populations were stable, and life changed little from century to century. Now the world of our children bears no relationship to that of our grandparents. It took millions of years to produce the first 2 billion population, the second was produced in 50 years. More people are added to the population each month than existed at the time of Christ, when our minds had certainly become modern. The road to the future will not be through the past, for biological evolution has not prepared us for a world in which communication is instant across continents, where thousands of images cross our path each day, and where we now control the fate of the earth and the biological future of our species. Biological evolution needs give way to conscious evolution.


1991   HEALING BRAIN

University of California, Santa Barbara

USING NEW SCIENCE OF MOOD MEDICINE
Recent advances in the brain and behavioral sciences confirm that the body is not a mindless machine. While stress may undermine health, certain positive states of mind may build immunity and restore health. Understanding the intimate dialog of mind and body opens the way to a variety of practical therapies that can mobilize the healing potential of the brain.


1990   HEALTHY PLEASURES

New York City

THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS
Positive moods and happiness can have beneficial health effects. And we can learn to control our moods and increase our happiness. Discover the tricks of the mind: Why money doesn't increase happiness, and small daily pleasures do. Why having an unhappy past can be used to boost your mood. How telling yourself a good story can improve your well-being.


1990   HEALTHY PLEASURES: USING THE NEW SCIENCE OF MOOD MEDICINE

San Francisco
Los Angeles

HEALTHY PLEASURES
Evolution has equipped us with an innate guide to health. By following pleasurable sensations we are rewarded twice: immediate enjoyment and better health. The healthiest people seem to be pleasure-loving, pleasure- seeking, pleasure-creating individuals.

THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS - USING MOOD MEDICINE
Research studies on happiness and well-being are puzzling: People aren't usually happy doing what they believe will make them happy and people who obtain great wealth and power don't necessarily become happier. By understanding the real determinants of happiness, people can learn to control their moods and increase personal happiness. Learn about the tricks of the mind: Why for most people money doesn't increase happiness, but small daily pleasures do. Why having an unhappy past can be used to improve mood in the present. How telling yourself a good story can improve well-being. Why confession may be good for the body as well as the soul. How current research in psychology can be used to improve mood, well-being and health.


1990   THE HEALING BRAIN: HEALTHY PLEASURES

Phoenix, AZ

THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS: USING MOOD MEDICINE
Research studies on happiness and well-being are puzzling: People aren't usually happy doing what they believe will make them happy and people who obtain great wealth and power don't necessarily become happier. By understanding the real determinants of happiness, people can learn to control their moods and increase personal happiness. Learn about the tricks of the mind: Why for most people money doesn't increase happiness, but small daily pleasures do. Why having an unhappy past can be used to improve mood in the present. How telling yourself a good story can improve well-being. Why confession may be good for the body as well as the soul. How current research in psychology can be used to improve mood, well-being and health.

HEALTHY ALTRUISM: THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF SELFLESS PLEASURES
Sometimes the best way to improve yourself is to forget yourself. By caring for and about something outside yourself-whether it be pets, plants, people, politics, or the planet-one may do much more to improve health than many self-centered health promotion regimens. Human beings are social animals. Connecting with and helping others, being part of the larger human organism or social body is vital to health. Learn about the possible benefits of altruism on mood, health and immunity and why it is therapeutic to help people strengthen their social connectedness.

HEALTHY ALTRUISM: WHY SOCIAL CONNECTEDNESS IS THERAPEUTIC
Sometimes the best way to improve yourself is to forget yourself. By caring for and about something outside yourself-whether it be pets, plants, people, politics, or the planet-one may do much more to improve health than many self-centered health promotion regimens. Human beings are social animals and the most striking ingredient in human life is cooperation. We seemed primed, biologically, to help other people and those who help others seem to be protected themselves. Connecting with and helping others, being part of the larger human organism or social body is vital to health. Learn about the possible benefits of altruism on mood, health and immunity and why it is therapeutic to help people strengthen their social connectedness.


1990   THE HEALING BRAIN

New York City
Boston

HEALTHY ALTRUISM: THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF SELFLESS PLEASURES
Sometimes the best way to improve yourself is to forget yourself. By caring for and about something outside yourself-whether it be pets, plants, people, politics, or the planet-one may do much more to improve health than many self-centered health promotion regimens. Human beings are social animals. Connecting with and helping others, being part of the larger human organism or social body is vital to health. Learn about the possible benefits of altruism on mood, health and immunity and why it is therapeutic to help people strengthen their social connectedness.


1989   THE HEALING BRAIN V

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

HEALTHY PLEASURES
The lecture presents evidence on: Why learning to be a pleasure-loving, pleasure-seeking, pleasure-creating individual may be the single most important thing you can do for your health. How to "play" to the natural strengths of mind and body. The cold, hard facts on pleasure. An overview of the latest -and often surprising - research on eating, drinking, sleeping, education, exercise and sex.


1987   THE HEALING BRAIN IV

University of California, Santa Cruz and Santa Barbara

THE BRAIN MINDS THE BODY
The brain is composed of many semi-independent systems which contribute to the primary role of the brain - that of keeping the body in a state of health. It does this by constantly maintaining the stability and coherence not only of our internal physiology but of our mental, emotional and social worlds as well.

EMOTIONS, IMMUNITY AND THE HEART
Emotions are innate responses which enable us to deal with challenges, but can also have profound effects on health. Recent studies reveal that emotions have specific patterns of activation, different effects on the immune system and different associations with the left and right hemispheres of the brain. Further, the way we manage emotions, especially anger, may have profound effects on heart disease.


1987   THE HEALING BRAIN

University of California, San Diego

MULTIMIND
Although we live in a thoroughly modern world, we do not have a thoroughly modern mind. We do not have a single brain; we have a multiple one. It is a complex and unorganized collection of special purpose solutions to meet different circumstances. These "small minds of the body" control health. The brain contains several different and independent centers of action each of which has a "mind of its own." Significant problems in our own health arise when our separated, small minds disagree.

HOW THE BRAIN MINDS THE BODY
The principal function of the brain is not the creation of rational thought, language, or art, but rather the maintenance of the health of the organism. From food avoidance to weight maintenance, the brain has developed sophisticated, intrinsic healing systems to protect the integrity and stability of the individual and social body. The brain is first and foremost a healing brain.


1986   THE HEALING BRAIN III

University of California, Santa Cruz and Santa Barbara

MULTIMIND
We do not have a thoroughly modern mind although we live in a thoroughly modern world. We do not have a single brain; we have a multiple one. We have a complex and unorganized collection of special-purpose solutions to meet different circumstances. We have "small" minds for reacting to emergencies, for detecting sharp changes in the environment, and many "minds of the body" which control health. The brain contains several different and independent centers of action each of which has a "mind of its own" There are significant problems for the maintenance of our health when our separated small minds disagree.


1985   THE HEALING BRAIN II

Palo Alto, CA
University of California, Davis

THE AMAZING BRAIN: EMOTIONS, THE DIVIDED BRAIN AND HEALTH
Emotions were here before we were. These important patterns of innate responses enable us to deal with challenges, but also have a profound effect on health. Recent studies reveal that different emotions have specific patterns of activation, different effects on immunity and health, and different associations with each hemisphere of our divided brain.


1985   THE HEALING BRAIN

University of California, Santa Barbara
New York City
Chicago
Boston

THE AMAZING BRAIN
The principal role of the brain is to maintain the health of the body in the face of a changing environment. The brain has been found to be far more flexible and adaptable than previously thought. It can grow in response to experience, it can change its chemistry and even its structure in response to the environment. The "keys" to brain function lie in the varied neurotransmitters and the division of the brain into the left and right hemispheres, each specialized for different modes of consciousness. How these keys can unlock different dimensions of our experience will be explored.

EMOTIONS, THE DIVIDED BRAIN AND HEALTH
Emotions were here before we were. These important patterns of innate responses enable us to deal with challenges, but also have a profound effect on health. Recent studies reveal that different emotions have specific patterns of activation, different effects on immunity and health, and different associations with each hemisphere of our divided brain.


1984   THE HEALING BRAIN

Palo Alto, Ca.
University of California at Santa Cruz

THE AMAZING BRAIN
The principal role of the brain is to maintain the health of the organism in the face of a changing environment. The brain has been found to be far more flexible and adaptable than previously thought. It can grow in response to experience, it can change its chemistry and even its structure in response to the environment. They "keys" to brain function lie in the varied neurotransmitters and the division of the brain into the left and right hemispheres, each specialized for different modes of consciousness.


1984   THE HEALING BRAIN

University of California, Santa Cruz
and University of California at Irvine, San Diego, and Davis
and Arizona State University

THE BRAIN AS A HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATION
The principal role of the brain is to maintain the health of the organism in the face of a changing environment. Complex integrative systems have evolved in the brain to control bodily functions. The brain is also far more sensitive than has been thought to subtle changes in nutrition, air quality, and the richness of stimulation in the environment.

LEFT BRAIN, RIGHT BRAIN: HEALTH AND CONSCIOUSNESS
The major division of the human brain is the two cerebral hemispheres. In most people, the left hemisphere is responsible for rational and logical thought, the right for intuitive and holistic thinking.


1983   NUTRITION, THE BRAIN AND THE MIND

New York City

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: AN INTRODUCTION
It is commonly thought that the brain is specially insulated from the workings of the body. However, it has been recently found that the brain is far more responsive to its "internal environment" than has been previously thought.

THE BRAIN, THE MIND AND WEIGHT CONTROL
INTRODUCTION TO THE SYMPOSIUM
Our weight seems to be regulated by an intricate series of mechanisms which keep weight on a course that we consciously do not like. People say "I've lost hundreds of pounds in my life"--the implication being that weight is always gained back, or "It doesn't matter how much I eat--I am just naturally fat" or, "I can gain weight just looking at food." Recent research indicates that these cliches are true. Their implications for brain states and weight control will be introduced.


1983   THE HEALING BRAIN

University of California, Santa Barbara

THE BRAIN AS A HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATION
The principal role of the brain is to maintain the health of the organism in the face of a changing environment. Complex integrative systems have evolved in the brain to control bodily functions. The brain is also far more sensitive than has been thought to subtle changes in nutrition, air quality, and the richness of stimulation in the environment.

LEFT BRAIN, RIGHT BRAIN: HEALTH AND CONSCIOUSNESS
The major division of the human brain is the two cerebral hemispheres. In most people, the left hemisphere is responsible for rational and logical thought, the right for intuitive and holistic thinking. The implications for health of the divisions in consciousness and emotions will be explored.


1983   THE HEALING BRAIN: New Knowledge, Updates

Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco

THE ROLE OF THE BRAIN IN HEALTH: AN INTRODUCTION

THE DIVIDED CORTEX AND EMOTIONS UPDATE
New research, using the method of EEG recordings, has now extended our original findings. When people are asked to think of past positive and negative emotions, a difference arises in the brain. The left side of the brain, in the frontal area, seems to be involved in the generation of positive feelings and the corresponding area of the right frontal cortex in negative ones.


1983   THE HEALING BRAIN

BCIT British Columbia Inst of Technology

THE HEALING BRAIN: AN INTRODUCTION
The "brain" is usually thought of as a static organ. However, recent research indicates that the brain is much more plastic than previously thought. The brain changes its organization to meet different situations; the cerebral hemispheres are selectively activated and suppressed for different types of thought.

BRAIN RESPONSE TO THE ENVIRONMENT
We are becoming increasingly aware of the ease with which the cerebral cortex of the brain can be changed by alterations in the external environment. Stimulation in infancy through an enriched environment can increase the size of the cortex. Even the brains of very old animals can grow in response to environmental enrichment.

THE DOUBLE BRAIN AND HEALTH: SYMPOSIUM SUMMARY
The major division of the human brain is the two cerebral hemispheres. In most people the left hemisphere is responsible for rational and logical thought, the right for intuitive and holistic thinking. Evidence from split-brain studies and studies recording electrical activity of the normal brain will be discussed. The implications for health will be considered along with a discussion of the many controversies in this field.


1982   THE HEALING BRAIN

Cape Cod
Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco

THE HEALING BRAIN: AN INTRODUCTION
The brain constantly adjusts its state to maintain the body. In fact, the main role of the brain is the maintenance of bodily functions and, therefore, the health of the organism. The brain constantly changes its operations to meet changing circumstances and bodily needs. The implication of such brain changes for health are profound.

THE DIVIDED BRAIN
The major division of the human brain is the two cerebral hemispheres. In most people, the left hemisphere is responsible for rational and logical thought, the right for intuitive and holistic thinking.


1981   THE HEALING BRAIN

Los Angeles, CA
Pacific Medical Center, Seattle

THE CHANGING BRAIN
The "brain" is usually thought of as a static organ. However, recent research I dictates that the brain is much more plastic than previously thought. The brain changes its organization to meet different situations: the cerebral hemispheres are selectively activated and suppressed for different types of thought. The chemistry of the brain changes with different food intakes and with changes in the weather.


1980   THE HEALING BRAIN II

University of California, San Francisco

We have radically underestimated our sensitivity to the social and physical environment as well as human capabilities for self-healing. Recent advances in the brain and behavioral sciences have revealed that interpersonal interactions can markedly influence physiological responses and that social support and friends may modify disease susceptibility. We are also learning more about the lasting effects of nutrition on brain development and how hypnosis and biofeedback may be used to mobilize the healing potential of the brain.


1980   THE HEALING BRAIN

University of California, San Francisco

THE SPECIALIZATION OF THE TWO HALVES OF THE BRAIN.
The human brain appears to be specialized for two different modes of thought. One is analytic, useful for linking ideas together in sequence. The second is holistic, useful for perceiving whole systems simultaneously. Both modes are important for normal functioning and health.


1978   HUMAN ECOLOGY

Institute for the Study of Human Knowledge
Boston, MA
Washington, DC

MODES OF HUMAN UNDERSTANDING I: WESTERN SCIENTIFIC PERSPECTIVE
Recent research has indicated that human capacities for understanding are not limited to the analytic mode. In most people, half of the brain is specialized to link elements together.


1977   HUMAN ECOLOGY

New York University

MODES OF HUMAN UNDERSTANDING I: WESTERN SCIENTIFIC PERSPECTIVE
Recent research has indicated that human capacities for understanding are not limited to the analytic mode. In most people, half of the brain is specialized to link elements together. The relevance of the development of these two modes to our current situation will be discussed.


1977   HUMAN ECOLOGY

New York University, New York City

HUMAN ECOLOGY AND HUMAN UNDERSTANDING
Recent research has indicated that human capacities for understanding are not limited to the analytic mode. In most people, half of the brain is specialized to link elements together.


1977   THE PSYCHOLOGY OF CONSCIOUSNESS

University of California, San Francisco

A SCIENCE OF CONSCIOUSNESS: INTRODUCTION
The study of consciousness is difficult, for, unlike most objects of scientific inquiry, consciousness is an internal, private process. Hence, many scientists and philosophers have focused on secondary phenomena, such as the study of behavior, physiology, and language, taking a reductionist and materialistic approach. Such reduction has obscured the primacy of consciousness in psychology, yet today, a new science of consciousness is developing, which draws from the methodology and technology of the twentieth century and the perspective of philosophical and religious tradition, in a new synthesis.


1977   BIOFEEDBACK, MEDITATION SELF-REGULATORY THERAPIES

University of California, San Francisco

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SELF-REGULATORY THERAPIES AND MEDITATION.
Many of the practices of esoteric traditions have common elements, although they may appear diverse. Meditative techniques such as mantra, koans, whirling and attending to breathing all focus attention on one, unchanging source of stimulation. Physiological responses such as EEG alpha and relaxation are also common. Such techniques often form parts of the medical care available in Eastern cultures. The objective study of these practices may yield insights on the capabilities of human self-regulation.


1976   THE PSYCHOLOGY OF CONSCIOUSNESS

University of California, San Francisco

A SCIENCE OF CONSCIOUSNESS: INTRODUCTION
The study of consciousness is difficult, for, unlike most objects of scientific inquiry, consciousness is an internal, private process. Hence, many scientists and philosophers have focused on secondary phenomena, such as the study of behavior, physiology, and language, taking a reductionistic and materialistic approach. Such reduction has obscured the primacy of consciousness in psychology, yet today a new science of consciousness is developing, which draws from the methodology and technology of the twentieth century and the perspective of philosophical and religious tradition, in new synthesis.

LATERAL SPECIALIZATION OF COGNITION: RESEARCH EVIDENCE AND IMPLICATIONS
In hundreds of experiments, research with normal people has confirmed that of the split-brain and neurosurgical cases: the two cerebral hemispheres are differentially involved in different cognitive tasks, and may operate in differing modes, one analytical and sequential; the other holistic and simultaneous.


1976   EDUCATING BOTH HALVES OF THE BRAIN

University of California, Berkeley
and other venues throughout a two-year period:
New York University, New York City
Phoenix, AZ
Dallas, TX
Atlanta, GA
Charlotte, NC
Miami Beach, FL
New Orleans, LA

TWO MINDS IN ONE HEAD
Professional educators have long hoped that research on the brain would illuminate the process of education, but until recently the great advances and breakthroughs in brain research have been of interest only to neuroscientists. Finally we have learned some facts about the brain that have profound implications for everyday classroom practice. It appears that our schools have been focusing most of their resources on tutoring only the left half of the brain. To develop all of a child's capabilities we must have curricula and materials for both sides of the brain, and we must cultivate the ability to use these two different minds in a complementary way.

The two cerebral hemispheres in humans are specialized for different cognitive functions--the left for verbal and analytic thought, the right for intuition and understanding patterns. When the two hemispheres are surgically disconnected they each appear conscious: i.e., two separate conscious minds in one head. Not only are they separate minds, but because of their specialization they are different, not duplicate minds. These conclusions have been extensively documented.

Numerous experiments have demonstrated this specialization in normal people. The study of how the two half-brains cooperate or interfere with each other has just begun. In the normal person with intact connections between the hemispheres, are these systems smoothly integrated? Or do they alternate in control, taking turns directing behavior? Clearly, there are possibilities for both cooperation and for conflict. Although many uncertainties remain, enough is known to begin considering educational policies and practices within the framework of what we do understand about the brain.


1976   PSYCHOLOGIES EAST & WEST

University of California, San Francisco

INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGIES EAST & WEST
Western psychology has emphasized an impersonal "objective" approach to the understanding of the mind, often limited to observable phenomena such as language, behavior, and physiology. Its strengths are well known, yet its limitations are apparent in the understanding of the esoteric traditions of the East. This lack of a solid base in our cultures has caused many to confuse contemporary "awareness trainings," packagings of exercises with the developed esoteric traditions.

AN EXTENDED CONCEPTION OF HUMAN CAPACITIES
As Western thinkers begin to consider the traditions of the East we find that they demand the addition of a dimension to our assumptions and our conceptions. As examples: Two different modes of consciousness exist in man and function in a complementary manner; our personal and scientific attention is being shifted inward to the mastery of mental and physical states; man is not so closed a system as we had thought--we are permeable to subtle sources of energy from biospheric and human forces that often lie unnoted; the concepts of what is "normal" for man are undergoing a revision.


1976   TRADITIONAL ESOTERIC PSYCHOLOGIES IN CONTEMPORARY LIFE

The New School, New York City

AN EXTENDED CONCEPTION OF MAN
As Western thinkers begin to consider the traditions of the East we find that they demand the addition of a dimension to our assumptions and our conceptions. As examples: two different modes of consciousness exist in man and function in a complementary manner; our personal and scientific attention is being shirted inward to the mastery of mental and physical states; man is not so closed a system as we had thought -we are permeable to subtle sources of energy from biospheric and human forces which often lie unnoted; the concepts of what is "normal" for man are undergoing a revision.

PSYCHOLOGIES EAST AND WEST: INTRODUCTION
Western psychology has emphasized an impersonal "objective" approach to the understanding of the mind, often limited to observable phenomena such as language, behavior, and physiology. Its strengths are well known, yet its limitations are apparent in the understanding of the esoteric traditions of the East. This lack of solid base in our culture has caused many to confuse contemporary "awareness trainings," packagings of exercises, etc., with the developed esoteric traditions.


1976   WAYS OF HEALING: ANCIENT & MODERN

University of California, San Francisco

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SELF-REGULATORY THERAPIES AND MEDITATION
Many of the practices of esoteric traditions have common elements, although they may appear to be diverse. Meditative techniques, such as mantra, koans, whirling and attending to breathing all focus attention on one, unchanging source of stimulation. Physiological responses such as EEG alpha and relaxation are also common. Such techniques often form parts of the medical care available in Eastern cultures. The objective study of these practices may yield insights on the capabilities of human self-regulation.


1976   COMBATING STRESS: BIOFEEDBACK, MEDITATION & SELF-REGULATORY THERAPIES.

Boston University, McLean Hospital & Tufts Medical School.

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SELF-REGULATORY THERAPIES AND MEDITATION.
Many of the practices of esoteric traditions have common elements, although they may appear to be diverse. Meditative techniques, such as mantra, koans, whirling and attending to breathing all focus attention on one, unchanging source of stimulation. Physiological responses such as EEG alpha and relaxation are also common. Such techniques often form parts of the medical care available in Eastern cultures. The objective study of these practices may yield insights on the capabilities of human self-regulation.


1975   BIOFEEDBACK MEDITATION & SELF-REGULATORY THERAPIES

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SELF-REGULATORY THERAPIES AND MEDITATION
Many of the practices of esoteric traditions have common elements, although they may appear to be diverse. Meditative techniques, such as mantra, koans, whirling and attending to breathing all focus attention on one, unchanging source of stimulation. Physiological responses such as EEG alpha and relaxation are also common. Such techniques often form parts of the medical care available in Eastern cultures. The objective study of these practices may yield insights on the capabilities of human self-regulation.


1975   THE PSYCHOLOGY OF CONSCIOUSNESS

University of Massachusetts

TRADITIONAL ESOTERIC PSYCHOLOGIES
While Western culture has cultivated a rational, verbal, analytic mode of consciousness, the Eastern traditions like Yoga, Zen, and Sufism have specialized in the education of intuition. As a result, many esoteric practices like meditation, body movement, storytelling, and crafts can be understood as well-developed techniques for turning off analytic modes of consciousness and shifting consciousness into more intuitive modes.


1975   THE PSYCHOLOGY OF CONSCIOUSNESS

University of California, Irvine

INTRODUCTION
Contemporary psychology is changing, and now includes many areas ignored or forgot-ten in the last half-century. Of central concern is the nature of human consciousness. How we perceive "reality" depends upon the nature of our sensory systems, past experiences, moods, and training. If our ordinary consciousness, therefore, is a personal construction and only one of many possible ways of organizing "reality," then consciousness can be changed by changing the way we construct it.

www.robertornstein.com
Updated December 15, 2010